Infuriating: Ironbound school uses playground for teacher parking lot

Newark children share school playground with teachers’ parking lot
A couple of parents quoted in this piece are friends, but any parent should find this practice infuriating. The school facilities paid for by Newark taxpayers should support the needs of children in the community, not the convenience of staff and administration.

The principal, Maria Merlo, continues a long-standing practice of turning the Ironbound grammar school’s playground into a parking lot for teachers and staff. With the cars there, about 34 of them, students get shortchanged because their play area is cut in half and they can’t stretch out and run as they should for recess and gym outdoors.

It’s been this way for reasons that don’t make sense to parents, who’ve been trying since last year to stop the practice of turning a playground into a parking lot.

“The cars don’t belong there — no ifs, ands or buts,” said Madeline Ruiz. “There’s no reason that can satisfy taking away this privilege from children.”

Reminder: Sit for a portrait this Friday and Saturday


Alone and Together: Tintype Portrait Studio at Gallery Aferro October 3 + 4th, 1-7 PM

email ewilcox@aferro.org for an appointment, or walk in.

Photographer Keliy Anderson-Staley is inviting the public to have their portrait taken at Gallery Aferro on October 3 and 4th from 1-7 PM. Sitters can come solo or with a loved one. The sittings are free. A print of the image is $10.

The downtown Newark area was once home to many portrait studios where people could come to have a high-quality portrait made. By photographing contemporary America, especially in diverse New Jersey, Keliy is compiling a beautifully made record of what we all really look like, using a classic process.

Keliy hopes to meet and photograph as many people as possible while she is in Newark. All are welcome!

This portrait series is made with the wet plate collodion process, the leading mode of photography in the 1850’s and 1860’s. Tintypes are positive images exposed onto metal. This historic process has a different relationship to time than digital or film photography. The chemistry is hand-mixed and poured onto the plate in front of the sitter. As soon as the exposure is made in the wooden view camera, the plate must be taken to a portable dark box to be developed and fixed. The wet plate collodion image captures a pose held over several seconds or even minutes. This prolonged gaze creates a tension between the sitter and the camera. While a snapshot captures a moment about a 1/1000 of a second long, the tintype process allows for a portrait of a person or a couple to unfold over time; the image produced can then slow down our looking. A viewer sees the hard lines of bone structure, wrinkles and blemishes, but also sees bright, focused eyes staring back intently. This process allows the photographer and the viewer to stare, but it is not entirely voyeuristic, as the sitter stares back. The act of taking someone’s portrait can once again be an event.

NJIT gets $250K to keep developing child-proof ‘smart gun’

NJIT gets $250K to keep developing child-proof ‘smart gun’
Good to see my alma-mater making a difference. It’s important to point out — lest we wake the trolls — that this technology is used to prevent child-related accidents, not deter crime.

NJIT has spent the last nine years on a “dynamic grip recognition” technology that can identify gun owners based on how they squeeze the trigger. The technology uses sensors located in the gun to identify unconscious, reflexive actions unique to each person and then decides whether the gunman is authorized to fire the weapon.

University officials say it works 99 percent of the time when paired with an off-the-shelf handgun outfitted with green and red lights to indicate whether the embedded circuitry decided to fire or not. They have tested it successfully with shooters wearing gloves, under timed conditions to simulate stressful conditions and using alternate hands.

City of Newark Hosts End of Summer Festival

City of Newark Hosts End of Summer Festival
It’ll be a busy weekend in Newark! In addition to the Brazilian Independence Festival at Riverbank Park, the city will be hosting an End of Summer Festival at the Boylan Recreation Center with music, karaoke, double-dutch exhibitions, face painting and fashion show. The festival will take place this Saturday at noon.

The festival will offer Hip-Hop dance performances by local youth; performances from winning contestants from the 2008 Newark Idol competition, amateur boxing matches, free blood pressure screenings from the Healthfirst NJ unit; summer basketball league championship games; double-dutch exhibitions; Golf and Tennis clinics; karaoke performances; face painting; steel drummers and stilt walkers.

“This year’s End of Summer Festival will bring a joyous close to our Super Summer programs, which have once again brought entertainment, education, empowerment, and unity to our neighborhoods and residents,” Mayor Booker said. “Newark has much to celebrate and I urge all residents to join us at the festival.”

Ringling Bros. coming to Newark arena

Ringling Bros. coming to Newark arena
First, bulls running loose in the city, now the Ledger has pictures of elephants storming Prudential Center.

Well, not quite. Minnie the Elephant is a part of the Ringling Bros Circus, posing with Mayor Booker and Bello the daredevil clown. The circus will be returning to the city at the Prudential Center with shows starting up in October.

“This is so meaningful to me,” Booker told the children, recalling his annual birthday circus trips with four friends when he was a boy. “We had to travel to New York to do it, and now I’m so excited that we’re bringing this great family entertainment home to Newark, N.J.”

The circus will perform seven shows at the Prudential Center, from Oct. 16 to 19, according to the show’s producer, Feld Entertainment. Feld has also booked the arena for two more of its family shows: Disney Playhouse Live from Sept. 5 to 7 and Disney on Ice in December.

Tintype Portrait Studio coming to Downtown Newark


Alone and Together: Tintype Portrait Studio at Gallery Aferro
October 3 + 4th, 1-7 PM

Photographer Keliy Anderson-Staley is inviting the public to have their portrait taken at Gallery Aferro on October 3 and 4th from 1-7 PM. Sitters can come solo or with a loved one. The sittings are free. A print of the image is $10.

The downtown Newark area was once home to many portrait studios where people could come to have a high-quality portrait made. By photographing contemporary America, especially in diverse New Jersey, Keliy is compiling a beautifully made record of what we all really look like, using a classic process.

Keliy hopes to meet and photograph as many people as possible while she is in Newark. All are welcome!

This portrait series is made with the wet plate collodion process, the leading mode of photography in the 1850’s and 1860’s. Tintypes are positive images exposed onto metal. This historic process has a different relationship to time than digital or film photography. The chemistry is hand-mixed and poured onto the plate in front of the sitter. As soon as the exposure is made in the wooden view camera, the plate must be taken to a portable dark box to be developed and fixed. The wet plate collodion image captures a pose held over several seconds or even minutes. This prolonged gaze creates a tension between the sitter and the camera. While a snapshot captures a moment about a 1/1000 of a second long, the tintype process allows for a portrait of a person or a couple to unfold over time; the image produced can then slow down our looking. A viewer sees the hard lines of bone structure, wrinkles and blemishes, but also sees bright, focused eyes staring back intently. This process allows the photographer and the viewer to stare, but it is not entirely voyeuristic, as the sitter stares back. The act of taking someone’s portrait can once again be an event.

CITY OF NEWARK ISSUES HEALTH ALERT TO WARN RESIDENTS ABOUT WEST NILE VIRUS

CITY OF NEWARK ISSUES HEALTH ALERT TO WARN RESIDENTS ABOUT WEST NILE VIRUS
Parents, take note: the city has issued a health alert about West Nile found in Newark and Irvington mosquitos. Preventative measures are listed in the press release after the jump.

The West Nile Virus is transmitted through the bite of a mosquito that has picked up the virus by feeding on an infected bird. The virus is not transmitted from birds to humans or from person to person. Symptoms of mild West Nile infection include fever, headache, and body aches, often with skin and swollen lymph glands. More severe infection is marked by headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, and paralysis.

Continue reading “CITY OF NEWARK ISSUES HEALTH ALERT TO WARN RESIDENTS ABOUT WEST NILE VIRUS”

Interview: Diesel Siedel of United Initiatives for Peace

This weekend, Diesa Siedel’s organization, United Initiatives for Peace, will be hosting an open 3-on-3 girls basketball tournament called Scholars for Ballers to promote athletics and education. The tournament will take place Saturday at 10:00 AM at St. Peter’s Recreational Center on Lyons Ave (map below) and is open to the public. Girls interested in competing must be high-school students or 2008 graduates.
Players will be competing for scholarships and other prizes to be presented at the awards ceremony on Sunday. On the podcast, we discuss eligibility for competing in the tournament, what brought UIP to Newark for this event, and how a high school girl might potentially get a shot to challenge Mayor Booker to a little 1-on-1.

The podcast is about 15 minutes. Click the play button below to listen.

[audio:http://dailynewarker.com/w/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/080828-tdn-interview-siedel.mp3%5D

Newark schools chief says 30,000 elementary students will wear uniforms

Newark schools chief says 30,000 elementary students will wear uniforms
Promised as a part of a larger reform package, shiny new Newark schools Superintendent Clifford Janey will require 30k students to wear uniforms to class starting in the winter of 2009.

Some schools already require students wear uniforms so the new policy won’t come as a shock. After parents lobbied the Elliott Street School Principal Angel Juarbe to mandate uniforms, he implemented a policy in 2003.

“It unified the students, promoted pride, helped student resist peer pressure and saved parents money,” said Juarbe who is now an executive assistant to the superintendent. “That was the big thing, parents could buy one or two uniforms and it was much less expensive than an entire back to school wardrobe.”

A Bullet Tears Through a Ceiling, and 2 Lives

A Bullet Tears Through a Ceiling, and 2 Lives
The Times shares the lives of the two teenagers who were involved in Thursday’s accidental fatal shooting. Bukhari Washington was slain by a bullet from an assault rifle owned by Terrance Perry in the downstairs apartment while Perry was toying with the weapon.

How the rifle came into Perry’s possession and his exact reason for obtaining it remain under investigation.

In the apartment upstairs, Bukhari Washington, 15, had just gone to sleep. At work at the local recreation center the previous day, he and four friends had practiced lip-synching New Edition’s “Candy Girl” for a coming talent show. After work, he and his best friend, Daquan Cuttino, shot hoops and went to see the latest Batman movie. Bukhari had stayed up all night, talking to friends.

He had a lot on his mind. Having overcome more than his share of family tragedy, he had made his way to a prestigious prep school. Now, though, he was considering leaving it for a public school, his friends said.

Downstairs, 19-year-old Terrance Perry was sitting in bed, playing with his rifle. He had spent the previous afternoon and evening delivering food at the Newark hospital where he worked. His grandmother picked him up after his shift – he had lived with her for years, and she worried about him on the streets – and dropped him off at his girlfriend’s apartment. At some point, he returned to his grandmother’s home, in the house where Bukhari and his mother lived in an apartment on the top floor.

The two knew each other but were not friends, and had been neighbors for about a year.